AIR Tutorial Students
AIR students at BirchA

Serving the San Diego American Indian Community for over 26 years

AIR Summer

Wishing You the Best New Years

SDSU
San Diego State University

USD
University of
San Diego


CSUSM
California Sate University
San Marcos


UCSD
University of California
San Diego

UCLA

Univeristy of California, Los Angeles

Cal Poly Pomona

Cal Poly Pomona


The American Indian Recruitment Program
Providing 26 years of Community Service

AIR Anounces Honors Program
Next Course starting April 5th

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Congratulatulations to our AIR Program Student Honorees for their excellence in Academics, Community and Cultural participation, and their Leadership.

Cheyenne Faulkner (Lumbee)
Amaya Esparza (Apachee/Zapoteca/Mixteca)
Nagavohma Lomayesva (Hopi/Kumeyaay)

AwardeeChairman MezaAwardee

AIR Banquet

Thank you to everyone who made our Summer 2019
a great success!!!

AIR Sum 19 Group

News for Students - (Monday Morning):

Daily News:
Indian Country:
Health

American Indians Can't Combat the Coronavirus Pandemic
Tribal leaders have stepped up to protect their communities and prevent the spread of the virus, but they face unique problems in combating this pandemic. 
March 30, 2020
by Kirsten Carlson

The coronavirus is hitting American Indians and Alaska Natives hard. Tribal citizens are dyingIndian nations have closed casinos to protect the public, and powwows and traditional gatherings have been canceled.
Among the crucial statistics that indicate how dire conditions are for American Indians and Alaska Natives: Indian Health Service hospitals have only 625 beds nationwide, with six intensive care unit beds and 10 ventilators to serve more than 2.5 million American Indians and Alaska Natives from 574 tribes.
Some tribes provide additional health services in their communities, but these programs only supply another 772 beds. That’s only 1,397 for 2.5 million people.
Governments at all levels have struggled to respond to the coronavirus pandemic as it spreads across the United States.

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Sovereignty

Why the Trump administration is moving to ‘disestablish’ a Massachusetts tribe’s reservation
"This is one of the most cruel and nonsensical acts I have seen since coming to Congress."
By

Nik DeCosta-Klipa, Boston.com Staff
March 29, 2020 | 1:11 PM
The Mashpee Wampanoag tribe is pledging to fight a move by President Donald Trump’s administration to “disestablish” its reservation.
Cedric Cromwell, the chairman of the Cape Cod-based tribe, says he was informed Friday at 4 p.m. by the Bureau of Indian Affairs that Department of the Interior Secretary David Bernhardt had ordered their 321-acre reservation be taken out of federal trust, following two court decisions declaring that the federal government didn’t have the authority to give the lands special status.

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Petroglyph

Tribal leaders face great need and don't have enough resources to respond to the coronavirus pandemic
Thursday, March 26, 2020   
By Kirsten Carlson (Wayne State University)
The Conversation - theconversation.com

The coronavirus is hitting American Indians and Alaska Natives hard. Tribal citizens are dyingIndian nations have closed casinos to protect the public, and powwows and traditional gatherings have been canceled.
Among the crucial statistics that indicate how dire conditions are for American Indians and Alaska Natives: Indian Health Service hospitals have only 625 beds nationwide, with six intensive care unit beds and 10 ventilators to serve more than 2.5 million American Indians and Alaska Natives from 574 tribes.
Some tribes provide additional health services in their communities, but these programs only supply another 772 beds. That’s only 1,397 for 2.5 million people.
Governments at all levels have struggled to respond to the coronavirus pandemic as it spreads across the United States.

Read more>

Gate

U.S. waives laws, requests input for 91 miles of new border wall construction in Arizona
Rafael Carranza, Arizona RepublicPublished 7:59 p.m. MT March 17, 2020 | Updated 9:04 p.m. MT March 17, 2020

TUCSON — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials plan to build or replace more than 91 miles of border barriers along the Arizona-Mexico border in one of the largest expansions of border wall construction in the state.
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which oversees CBP, waived a series of federal laws to speed up construction in all four Arizona border counties and opened a month-long period for the public to submit comments on the planned construction projects.
CBP issued an advisory Monday detailing the 91.5 miles where construction will take place.
In the Border Patrol's Tucson Sector: 32 miles in Cochise County, 15 miles in Pima County and 27 miles in Santa Cruz County. In the Yuma Sector: 17.5 miles in Yuma County and Imperial County, California.
The new bollard fencing going up will measure 30 feet in height and will be built as part of a system. 
"The projects also include the installation of a linear ground detection system, road construction or refurbishment, and the installation of lighting, which will be supported by grid power and include embedded cameras," the agency said. 
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AIR News and
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Banquet

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AIR Newsletter
AIRNews HQ: read more (HQ)>

AIR EOY 16-17

Annual Report: read more >

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San Diego, CA Weather

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Campo, CA Weather

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Escondido. CA Weather

CA Earthquakes
EARTHQUAKES

 

Fake Courts for Real Learning with Morongo Tribe
ICTMN Staff - 12/23/15

The Morongo Band of Mission Indians remains a strong advocate for education, according to tribal chairman Robert Martin. That devotion could be seen in the moot court competition held at the Morongo Tribal Administrative Center on December 5.
American Indian students from Southern and Central California participated in UCLA Law School’s competition, during which they learned about the legal system and earned college credits.
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Procopio

ANA is pleased to anounce the inclusion of AIR's Pride for Life Project within "Fiscal Year 2008 Report to Congress on Impact and Effectiveness of Administration for Native American Projects" and the inclusion of AIR's Voices of Tomorrow Project within "Fiscal Year 2009 Report to Congress on Impact and Effectiveness of Administration for Native American Projects"

ANA Report

ANA 2009

USD Basketball

USD

WCC Tournament Starts with LMU on Thursday
Men's Basketball March 03, 2020
San Diego Toreros (9-22, 2-14 WCC)  • LMU Lions (10-20, 4-12 WCC)
Thursday, March 5  • 6 p.m.
Orleans Arena (9,500)  • Las Vegas, Nev.
TV   •  WCC Network  |  Live Audio  |  Live Stats  • USDToreros.com 
SAN DIEGO – Looking to repeat its run from last season out of the first round, San Diego will open the 2019-20 UCU WCC Basketball Tournament on Thursday with a 6 p.m. contest against the No. 8 seed LMU.
The Toreros, who are the No. 9 seed and coming off an end of the season in which it faced the top-four teams in the final four games, only faced the Lions once this season - the conference opener on January 2. The Lions enter the tournament having lost three of their last four.
Thursday's first round game can be watched on the WCC Network and heard here, with the Voice of the Toreros Jack Cronin on the ca
ll.
Read more >

 
UCLA Basketball:
UCLA

Former UCLA greats are in awe of current Bruins’ late-season run
By BEN BOLCHSTAFF WRITER 
MARCH 3, 2020
10:02 AM

As the camera panned the crowd inside Pauley Pavilion, showing one UCLA legend after another on the video board, it felt like an ode to generations of Bruin greatness.
Hey, there’s Sidney Wicks, the power forward who sparked UCLA’s 88-game winning streak. Wow, that’s Lucius Allen, the guard who helped the Bruins freshmen stomp the varsity team. Oh, man, there’s Jamaal Wilkes, the small forward whom coach John Wooden once described as his ideal player.
The icons fixed their focus elsewhere, consumed by a batch of Bruins who had a losing record only 1½ months ago. Things have changed considerably over the last six weeks with this team capturing the imagination of its revered predecessors every bit as much as that of the casual fan.
“I don’t think, of all the UCLA teams that have ever put on that uniform, that the fans, the alumni, those who follow UCLA could be more proud of than this team here,” said Gail Goodrich. He was the honorary captain Saturday during the Bruins’ 69-64 victory over Arizona that gave them a seventh consecutive win and sole possession of first place in the Pac-12 Conference.
Read more >

AIR Honors Page

AIYEC COURT

Project AIYEC

For information on current course offered, training and registration information please go to our AIR Honor Page (link below)

AIR Honors Page