AIR Tutorial Students
AIR students at BirchA

Serving the San Diego American Indian Community for over 25 years

AIR Summer


SDSU
San Diego State University

USD
University of
San Diego


CSUSM
California Sate University
San Marcos


UCSD
University of California
San Diego

UCLA

Univeristy of California, Los Angeles

TLCEE

Tribal Learning Communities & Educational Exchange, UCLA

Cal Poly Pomona

Cal Poly Pomona


The American Indian Recruitment Program
Providing 25 years of Community Service


AIR Program Banquet 2018

Thank you, for your Community Support!
AIR Programs Banquet 2018

Mentor Honoree student awardees

SDSU President sHANE

bIRDSINGER

We congratulate our 2018 AIR Programs Awardees. Each year we honor those that have demonstrated great achievement in community contribution, academics and leadership.

Mentor Leadership and Student Awardee:
Bernice Paipa (Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel)
Thank you for helping our Native Youth pursue a greater future within education

Student Leadership Awardee: Tate Garcia (Lakota/Tongva)
Student Leadership Awardee: Kaiya Maxcy
(Barona Band of Mission Indians)

Birch

News for Students - (Weds. Morning):

Indian Country:
Tribal Rights

Colorado River Indian Tribes Offer Large Supply of Water to Arizona’s Drought Contingency Plan
Parker Pioneer (From the CRIT Facebook page)

Nov 13, 2018 Updated 22 hrs ago
The Colorado River Indian Tribes (CRIT) Tribal Council in western Arizona has offered the State of Arizona 50,000 acre feet of water a year for three years beginning in January 2020 to head off drought caused water shortages and help insure the state of Arizona in the Drought Contingency Planning while protecting the Colorado River. Currently, the state of Arizona is struggling as water levels continue to drop at Lake Mead.
The water from the CRIT offer, outlined in a Nov. 9 letter to the Arizona Department of Water Resources and the Central Arizona Conservation District, would be stored in Lake Mead to help the State of Arizona and other Colorado River Basin states adopt the Lower Basin Drought Contingency Plan.

Read more>

Health

Native Sun News Today: Tribes discuss takeover of troubled hospital
Is Sioux San move a done deal?
By Ernestine Chasing Hawk - Native Sun News Today Staff Writer  - nativesunnews.today

RAPID CITY – The future of Sioux San Hospital, one of the oldest buildings in Rapid City and the nucleus of the Rapid City Indian Community, is at stake.
A proposal to build a new facility on land donated by local developer Hani Shafei on the northeast side of Rapid City and operated by the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board via a 638 contract under the Indian Self Determination Act has many Indian community members asking questions.
To answer questions that still remain over the future of Sioux San Hospital, CEO of the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board Jerilyn Church gave a comprehensive presentation last Wednesday evening at the Journey Museum.

Read more>

Stop Hate

Anti-Indian hate crimes rose dramatically in first year of Trump presidency
Tuesday, November 13, 2018   - By Acee Agoyo

Hate crimes against Native Americans increased a whopping 63 percent in the first year of Donald Trump's presidency, according to new data released by the FBI.
Law enforcement agencies across the nation reported 251 hate crime incidents against American Indians and Alaska Natives in 2017. That represents a significant jump from the 154 incidents seen as the Barack Obama era came to a close.
The incidents involved 321 victims, according to the Uniform Crime Reporting Program’s annual Hate Crime Statistics report. That figure represents a nearly 90 percent increase in victims from the year prior, the data shows.
The report does not fully explore the reasons the dramatic rise in hate crimes against the first Americans. It's possible that law enforcement agencies are doing a better job at disclosing such incidents or that Native people have been more willing to come forward when they feel victimized.

Read more>

Racism

GOP Mississippi senator facing criticism over comment about 'public hanging'
By Kate Sullivan, CNN - Updated 9:04 AM ET, Mon November 12, 2018

Washington (CNN-)Mississippi Republican Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith joked about going "front row" to a "public hanging" in a video posted to Twitter on Sunday morning, prompting her African-American opponent to call her comment "reprehensible."
"If he invited me to a public hanging, I'd be on the front row," the senator is heard saying in the video.
Hyde-Smith faces former Democratic Rep. Mike Espy in a runoff election on November 27 for the Mississippi Senate seat. The runoff election was triggered when neither she nor Espy received more than 50% of the vote total on November 6.
Hyde-Smith was appointed in April to fill the seat vacated by longtime Republican Sen. Thad Cochran, who stepped down due to health reasons. She became the first female senator to represent the state.

Read more>

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Leaders Project:
Leaders UCLA
 
 
 

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AIR EOY 16-17

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CA Earthquakes
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Fake Courts for Real Learning with Morongo Tribe
ICTMN Staff - 12/23/15

The Morongo Band of Mission Indians remains a strong advocate for education, according to tribal chairman Robert Martin. That devotion could be seen in the moot court competition held at the Morongo Tribal Administrative Center on December 5.
American Indian students from Southern and Central California participated in UCLA Law School’s competition, during which they learned about the legal system and earned college credits.
Read More>

Procopio

ANA is pleased to anounce the inclusion of AIR's Pride for Life Project within "Fiscal Year 2008 Report to Congress on Impact and Effectiveness of Administration for Native American Projects" and the inclusion of AIR's Voices of Tomorrow Project within "Fiscal Year 2009 Report to Congress on Impact and Effectiveness of Administration for Native American Projects"

ANA Report

ANA 2009

USD Basketball

USD

Toreros Win PFL Title on Record-Setting Day
San Diego wins 11th PFL title, secures FCS Playoffs berth

SAN DIEGO – San Diego clinched the Pioneer Football League championship and automatic berth to the FCS Playoffs with a thrilling 56-52 victory against Davidson on Saturday afternoon at Torero Stadium.
It was a wild game filled with offense as FCS offensive records and program records were broken en route to the Toreros (8-2, 7-0 PFL) seventh PFL title in the past eight years and fifth consecutive.
With a Marist loss at Drake earlier in the day, a Toreros victory against the Wildcats (5-5, 2-5 PFL) would secure their 11th PFL title in program history and fifth consecutive trip to the FCS Playoffs. 

The Toreros needed its biggest comeback of the season to get the job done, however, as Davidson produced electrifying offensive plays and jumped on USD early. The Toreros trailed the Wildcats by 24 points twice in the first half.
Read more >
 
UCLA Football:
UCLA

Will this be the worst USC-UCLA game ever? Not necessarily
By DAVID WHARTON
NOV 13, 2018 | 4:00 PM

His UCLA team had just lost to Arizona State, another misstep in a long, dismal season, when tight end Caleb Wilson was asked about facing USC next weekend. Did it mean anything special?
“It used to,” he said. “But it’s just another game to me.”
If that sounds like heresy — at least to college football fans in Southern California — Wilson has the numbers to justify his lack of reverence for the 88th edition of the crosstown rivalry.
Saturday marks only the seventh time since 1929 that neither the Bruins nor the Trojans have a winning record entering the annual showdown. Their 13 combined losses are the most ever.
The teams won’t battle each other for a Rose Bowl berth, which they have done on 22 occasions. There won’t be an epic struggle in the national spotlight, nothing reminiscent of O.J. Simpson versus Gary Beban or Troy Aikman versus Rodney Peete.
The 5-5 Trojans are simply hoping to get bowl-eligible before their finale against third-ranked Notre Dame. And the Bruins? They’re looking for a bright spot in a 2-8 season.

“We’re obviously competing every week here and we’ve been close a couple times,” UCLA coach Chip Kelly said. “I think [a win] would pay big dividends to these guys.”
Read more >